fbpx

Wedding Guest Guide: Decoding the Wedding Dress Code
 

 
Did you receive a wedding invitation with a dress code you don’t understand? Not to worry, the expert Chandler Vietnamese Wedding Photographer, Saiaf Films, is here to decode it for you—and make sure you don’t stand out for the wrong reasons in the wedding photos.

“White Tie”

This means extremely formal. Imagine dressing for royal weddings and state dinners—ladies are expected to be in ball gowns and gloves and gentlemen in tails or full military uniform. This looks the most elegant in photographs and one of the most favourite among Sikh Wedding Photographer.

“Black Tie”

This is the second most formal dress code. Men are in tux and bow tie and ladies are in long gowns or knee-length cocktail dresses.

“Morning Suit”

This is a very traditional British-style wedding. Men are in black or grey morning coat, striped trousers, waistcoat and a top hat, while women are in knee-length cocktail dresses with a jacket and hat.

“Lounge Suit”

This outfit calls for men to be in black or grey suit with a tie. Ladies should wear knee-length cocktail dresses.

“Casual”

Casual for weddings does not mean jeans! Keep that in mind. Men should still wear dress trousers and button-down shirts. Ladies have the option to wear a summer dress or a smart blouse and tailored trousers.

“Beach Formal”

From the name itself, you should still look elegant in the beach—as if you are going to a high-end seaside restaurant. But wear shoes suited for sand, like boat shoes for men and formal espadrille sandals for women. This dress code creates the most laidback appeal for your Bengal Wedding Photographer to capture. But hey, still no flip-flops allowed!

“Festive Dress”

This is often requested for Christmas, New Year’s Eve or a themed wedding. Sparkly cocktail attire is perfect unless the couple gives you further instructions.

The last, and the most important tip above all according to Saiaf Films, never wear white unless specifically stated, because that’s the bride’s colour. If there’s no dress code on the invite, always err on the formal side of caution. It’s much better to remove a hat or a tie if the Fremont Wedding Photographer asks, than feel embarrassed the entire event because you didn’t wear one.